Getting Up Close and Personal with the Narragansett Bay

Save The Bay's Exploration Center and Aquarium on Easton's Beach is a great way to get hands-on with marine life from Narragansett Bay. 

Save The Bay's Exploration Center and Aquarium on Easton's Beach is a great way to get hands-on with marine life from Narragansett Bay. 

Spotfin butterflyfish. Short big-eye. Crevalle jack. Striped burrfish. While this may sound like a list of fantastical creatures, they’re all very much part of the world in which we live. Not only are these the actual names of various sea creatures, but you can now see them for yourself thanks to Save the Bay’s Exploration Center & Aquarium’s new exhibit, "Bay of the Future." Need another reason to schedule a stop at this popular destination during your visit to Newport? How about more than 130 reasons! 

Explore And More 

From sea stars and spider crabs to little skates and dogfish sharks, this interactive marine science center is home to more than 130 creatures -- all of which call the local waters of the Narragansett Bay home. Touch tanks, the “feeding frenzy” program, and monthly themes -- September’s is “Captivating Crustaceans”! -- means there are plenty of deepwater delights to discover at Rhode Island’s only aquarium to exclusively feature Narragansett Bay marine life.

Due to the Exploration Center & Aquarium's close proximity to Newport’s sole ocean-facing bay, beachcombers can call on all that newfound knowledge while doing some exploring of their own afterwards.

Facing The Future

As if all of that isn’t enough, Save the Bay’s newest and largest-ever warm-water exhibit gives visitors a rare glimpse into what the Narragansett Bay will look like a thousand years into the future due to unnatural rising ocean temperatures and the migration of fish from their natural habitats into others. Looking for tips on how you can do your part to help the world reverse course and combat climate change? The aquarium staff will offer these up as well.

Local volunteers help Save The Bay dig shallow creeks to help restore RISD salt marsh in Barrington. 

Local volunteers help Save The Bay dig shallow creeks to help restore RISD salt marsh in Barrington. 

According to Save The Bay Aquarium Manager Adam Kovarsky, “We connect our community to our own local Bay through the many hands-on and close-up experiences at our Exploration Center & Aquarium. This new exhibit is especially exciting because it brings all of our tropical together in a way that really showcases the effects of climate change in our local waters."

Doing Your Part

We’ve already established that the Exploration Center & Aquarium isn’t just an average aquarium. In fact, it's much, much more than that. In addition to offering each visitor an up-close-and-personal look at the remarkable Narragansett Bay, Save the Bay has also taken a vital leadership role in protecting this environmental treasure and all of its amazing inhabitants.

Dozens of volunteers helped Save The Bay pick up trash and litter at Salty Brine Beach in Narragansett during International Coastal Cleanup Day. 

Dozens of volunteers helped Save The Bay pick up trash and litter at Salty Brine Beach in Narragansett during International Coastal Cleanup Day. 

Aside from the Exploration Center & Aquarium, Save the Bay offers up a breadth and depth of educational programming. Fancy a lighthouse tourseal watch cruise, or birding adventure? Let Save the Bay serve as your tour guide and teacher during your visit to Newport -- not just as a passive observer of the extraordinary beauty of the region, but also as an active steward of its future.